Thursday, November 02, 2006

Blog On #9

Tags: Blogs & Bloggers, Middle East & North Africa, Breaking News, Egypt, Weblog, Cyber-Activism, Film, Human Rights, Protest, Youth, Entertainment, Politics

Last time I looked, there were 55 Million of us... 55 Million bloggers! And guess what? No matter how big or how small your blog is, whether you have 5 readers or 500,000, you ARE making a difference! You're part of the beat, part of the movement... Keep on Blogging!

Amira Al Hussaini has put heart and soul on the line in blogging about the post-Ramadan sexual attacks on Egyptian women in the streets of Cairo. Let me just say the men who participated in this should be ashamed. Their Ramadan prayers and fasting were for nothing. Now to Amira:

Citizen journalism (blogging) took a new turn in Egypt this week, with online journals going where traditional media dared not go.

It was only after bloggers brought a two-day orgy of sexual harrassment in downtown Cairo to the forefront that newspapers and television channels started dealing with the issue.

Discussions on the issue are still raging at the Egyptian blogosphere, with some blaming the government for not taking action and allowing the incidents to go ahead and others accusing the bloggers of blowing the incident out of proportion in a bid to embarrass the authorities.

Wael Abbas, who was among the first bloggers to write about the incident, lists a number of sites containing links to newspaper articles, in Arabic and English, which have touched on the topic.
He also complains that an Interior Ministry official tried to tarnish his reputation on a television interview for blowing the whistle.

Fellow blogger Malek, also known as Malcolm X and who was actually the first to write about the scandal, also posts links to newspapers articles as well as pictures from Wael Abbas’ blog to show that what he saw and blogged about was the truth.

Blogger Asad follows the same line with a post containing links to other blogs and news and television sites which covered the incident.
كادت الجريمة تمر مرور الكرام كما مرّت وتمر غيرها من الجرائم في بلادنا المنكوبة كل يوم , إلا أن مجموعة من المدوّنين المصريين كانوا هناك ونشروا شهاداتهم التي تلقفتها باقي المدونات , لتتحول الواقعة إلى قضية رأي عام , تناولتها الصحف والتغطيات التلفزيونية .
“This crime would have gone unnoticed just like other crimes in our country. However, a number of bloggers were there and published what they saw online. It was picked by other blogs, forcing the incident to be a national issue, which newspapers and television covered later on,” explains Asad.
(more…)

Previously: Blog On #8

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