Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Blogger's Digest » 11 July 2012

Music ::: Meet SEWA!

(via Black Looks blog) "Sewa is a Nigerian singer/songwriter and a recording artist who strongly believes in God and her continent Africa." Click on the image for more!

Bulgarian blog “Живот Мой” (”My Life”) published [bg] the 1888 local legislation on how to become a prostitute in the Black Sea coastal city of Varna. The bill contains the requirements for women willing to become prostitutes; regulations on brothels; health requirements before, during and after being a prostitute; and legal proceedings in case of violation of the above rules. These documents are in striking contrast with the current Bulgarian legislation on prostitution: a tolerated gray area that allows the country to be a big player on the international sex trade scene and was estimated to generate 1 billion euros income.

Using two empty plastic bottles and a zipper, the Colombian Version Beta Show [es] uses a video to teach viewers how to make a storage container.

Saudi blogger Ahmed Al Omran tweets: “Hai'a [Saudi religious police] targets corniche-goers with a mobile mosque. If they can't force you to go to mosque, they bring mosque to you.”

Facebook, Skype Give Cosmetic Surgery Industry a Lift

(via BetaBeat) One day in 2008, while using the popular videochat service Skype, Tina Consorti had an uncomfortable realization. She didn’t like how she looked on the little web screen. Her chin was sagging a bit, and shadowy wrinkles were forming like rings on a tree stump around her neck. It actually wasn’t so bad in the mirror—she checked—but on Skype and other social media services, the flaws seemed amplified.

Protests Rising Within China

Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore, News Report: The rapid rise of social media has played a significant role in growing civic awareness among the populace. China’s micro-blogs have helped inspire large gatherings of protestors. Users, many who were born in the post-1990s and are well-educated, have quickly spread details and images of protests around the country, forcing the hand of the government. ast week, the word “Shifang” (which the government did not block online) was the most widely searched term on China’s micro-blogs.
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